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Resource Guide

Millions silently struggle with their mental wellness every day.​ We have compiled some resources to help navigate your mental health.
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Mental Wellness Recovery Guide

A free resource for anyone considering recovery.
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Resources for Caregivers

Explore for support for caregivers and resources for individuals.
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Colorado Crisis Services

Free help and resources, 24/7.
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What to Expect From Treatment

Learn about treatment and hear others stories.

Useful Links


You don’t have to be alone in this. The first step to recovery can be small, but it will no doubt change your life. In addition to Project Helping, there are many resources that can lead you to that first step, or help you on your next step. No matter your background, or how far you are into your journey to better your mental health, these resources can be of help.

These are the resources we have found to be the most helpful. They do not represent a complete list of all available resources.

Articles

Check out the articles below to listen to other peoples stories, strategies, and more.
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Doing something nice for someone else often leaves people feeling good about themselves and positive about their place in the world.

But does that mean practicing random acts of kindness has scientifically proven therapeutic value in treating mood disorders like depression?

Yes, according to a growing body of research that has found that “positive activity interventions” — like helping someone with groceries, writing a thank you note or even counting your blessings — can serve as an effective, low-cost treatment for depression.

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Helping Others: With Depression, Helping Others May in Turn Help You

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I am 14 years old, it’s the middle of the afternoon, and I’m curled into a ball at the bottom of the stairs. I’ve intended to drag my uncooperative limbs upstairs to my dark disaster of a bedroom and sleep until everything hurts a little less, but my body and brain have simply drained down. I crumple into a bony, frizzy-haired heap on the gold shag rug, convinced that the only thing I have left to offer the world is the removal of my ugly presence from it, but at that moment, I’m too exhausted to do anything about it.

I sink into unconsciousness, mumbling over and over again, “I need help… I need help… I need help.” I’m too quiet. No one hears.

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Going Public with Depression

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With busy lives, it can be hard to find time to volunteer. However, the benefits of volunteering can be enormous. Volunteering offers vital help to people in need, worthwhile causes, and the community, but the benefits can be even greater for you, the volunteer. The right match can help you to find friends, connect with the community, learn new skills, and even advance your career.

Giving to others can also help protect your mental and physical health. It can reduce stress, combat depression, keep you mentally stimulated, and provide a sense of purpose. While it’s true that the more you volunteer, the more benefits you’ll experience, volunteering doesn’t have to involve a long-term commitment or take a huge amount of time out of your busy day. Giving in even simple ways can help those in need and improve your health and happiness.

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Volunteering and its Surprising Benefits

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Most of us know that if we eat our fruit and veggies, exercise often, and avoid smoking, we have a better chance of living longer and healthier lives. But your doctor may not have told you that regularly giving to others should perhaps be added to that healthy checklist. A new paper by Dr. Suzanne Richards and collegues at the University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK, reviewed 40 studies from the past 20 years on the link between volunteering and health. Published today in BMC Public Health, the paper finds that volunteering is associated with lower depression, increased well-being, and a 22 percent reduction in the risk of dying.

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Everyday Health: How Volunteering Can Lessen Depression and Extend Your Life

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I feel that most of my depression stemmed from a nagging sense that something in my life was missing. No matter what I accomplished, I always felt I was in a race to be more, do more, get more. I couldn’t figure out what I was missing, or what needed to be fixed, but my inability to find it was causing me a great deal of pain and struggle.

Despite that feeling of struggle, I continued to do the best I could with my life. I made daily efforts to fill that something sized hole with things like success, money and professional accolades. My efforts were admirable, at least.

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Elephant Journal: Running From Myself by Justin Kruger (Project Helping Founder)

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Depression drains your energy, hope, and drive, making it difficult to take the steps that will help you to feel better. Sometimes, just thinking about the things you should do to feel better, like exercising or spending time with friends, can seem exhausting or impossible to put into action.

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Dealing with Depression: Self Help and Coping Tips

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That a “universally beloved” entertainer like Robin Williams could commit suicide “speaks to the power of psychiatric illness,” mental health experts say.

The fact that someone as successful as Williams could kill himself shows that suicide is “not about objective markers of happiness and success,” said Dost Ongur, an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and chief of the psychotic disorders division at McLean Hospital outside of Boston.

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Suicide a Risk Even for Beloved Characters like Robin Williams

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10 Facts That Prove Helping Others Is A Key To Achieving Happiness

Giving back has an effect on your body. Studies show that when people donated to charity, the mesolimbic system, the portion of the brain responsible for feelings of reward, was triggered. The brain also releases feel-good chemicals and spurs you to perform more kind acts — something psychologists call “helper’s high.”

Guided Resources

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Mental Wellness
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Our mission is to make it ridiculously easy to find a sense of purpose and create meaningful connections. We do this by hosting over 700 annual volunteer experiences, providing an online community called KyndHub, and delivering volunteer projects called Kynd Kits.
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